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  Section: Genetics » Sexuality and Recombination in Bacteria and Viruses
 
 
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Replication of bacteriophages

 
     
 
Content
Sexuality and Recombination in Bacteria and Viruses
Three Methods for Transfer of Genetic Material 
Sexual conjugation in bacteria 
Culture media and mutant strains
Discovery of gene transfer
Discovery of linkage in bacteria
Donor and recipient strains
- Mechanism of chromosome transfer
- Physical structures involved in chromosome transfer
Linkage maps in bacteria
Conjugation mapping through interrupted mapping
Circular linkage map
Linkage information from transformation
Recombination after gene transfer
High resolution mapping
Linear order of genes
Replication and recombination in viruses 
Replication of bacteriophages
Lysogenic bacteria
Transduction
Recombination in viruses
Circular genetic maps in viruses

A typical bacteriophage (abbreviated as 'phage' meaning 'eaters of bacteria') consists of a head with protein sheath containing DNA and a tail with tail fibres (Fig. 12.17). A bacterium that has been infected by phage will undergo lysis (breaks open) within about 30 minutes and will release about 100 phage particles complete in all respects (Fig. 12.18). After infection, phage DNA forces the host to work for the parasite, so that complete host machinery is utilized for replication of phage particle. The infected cell thus creates new protein subunits for the phage head and tail and also makes additional DNA segments identical to DNA of the invading phage particle. In other words we can say that the phage orders the host's genetic material to stop functioning and establishes itself in power, controlling entire cell's protein metabolism. We can also describe the phage growth as a molecular cancer, since it keeps on multiplying till the host cell undergoes lysis.

T4 bacteriophage and its components : (a) on top lel't-a complex phage particle is shown; (b) on bottom left-a phage particle attached to bacterial cell wall is shown; (c) on the right-various components, are shown.
Fig. 12.17. T4 bacteriophage and its components : (a) on top lel't-a complex phage particle is shown; (b) on bottom left-a phage particle attached to bacterial cell wall is shown; (c) on the right-various components, are shown.
 
Different stages of infection, multiplication and lysis of virus particles in a bacterial cell; the clock shows the time taken for different steps of reproduction of virus.
Fig. 12.18. Different stages of infection, multiplication and lysis of virus particles in a bacterial cell; the clock shows the time taken for different steps of reproduction of virus.

 
     
 
 
     




     
 
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