Algae, Tree, Herbs, Bush, Shrub, Grasses, Vines, Fern, Moss, Spermatophyta, Bryophyta, Fern Ally, Flower, Photosynthesis, Eukaryote, Prokaryote, carbohydrate, vitamins, amino acids, botany, lipids, proteins, cell, cell wall, biotechnology, metabolities, enzymes, agriculture, horticulture, agronomy, bryology, plaleobotany, phytochemistry, enthnobotany, anatomy, ecology, plant breeding, ecology, genetics, chlorophyll, chloroplast, gymnosperms, sporophytes, spores, seed, pollination, pollen, agriculture, horticulture, taxanomy, fungi, molecular biology, biochemistry, bioinfomatics, microbiology, fertilizers, insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, plant growth regulators, medicinal plants, herbal medicines, chemistry, cytogenetics, bryology, ethnobotany, plant pathology, methodolgy, research institutes, scientific journals, companies, farmer, scientists, plant nutrition
Select Language:
 
 
 
 
Main Menu
Please click the main subject to get the list of sub-categories
 
Services offered
 
 
 
 
  Section: Introduction to Botany » Respiration and Fermentation
 
 
Please share with your friends:  
 
 

Hydrogenation

 
     
 
Content
Respiration and Fermentation
  The ATP Molecule
  Respiration and Photosynthesis
  The Anaerobic and Aerobic Pathways
  Hydrogenation
  The Carbon Cycle

The production of ethyl alcohol by one pathway and acetic acid by the other cannot be attributed solely to one process being anaerobic and the other being aerobic. These chemical changes are controlled by enzymes, and the kinds of reactions that odcur depend on the kinds of enzymes available. One type of reaction that occurs as carbohydrate is broken down is called dehydrogenation (wherein hydrogen atoms are removed from the molecule). The particular enzyme required for dehydrogenation is called dehydrogenase. When the hydrogen bonds are broken, energy is released. Some of this energy is used to maintain the reaction, some is lost as heat, and some is used in the formation of ATP The removal of hydrogen atoms requires a hydrogen acceptor. In aerobic respiration, the hydrogen acceptor is oxygen. Hydrogenation in aerobic respiration, then, results in the manufacture of water. This is not a one step process; rather, it is accomplished by a series of transfers from carrier to carrier (figure 10-8). As the hydrogen passes from one carrier to the next, energy is released at each step (figure 10-9).

Hydrogen obtained from "food" passes through several different steps before contributing to the formation of water.
Figure 10-8 Hydrogen obtained from "food" passes through several different steps before contributing to the formation of water.
 
An elaboration of figure 10-8. As hydrogen is passed from one molecule to another, energy is released and used in the manufacture of ATP.
Figure 10-9 An elaboration of figure 10-8. As hydrogen is passed from one molecule to another, energy is released and used in the manufacture of ATP..

 
     
 
 
     



     
 
Copyrights 2012 © Biocyclopedia.com | Disclaimer