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  Section: Introduction to Botany » Evolution
 
 
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The Tenets of Darwinian Theory

 
     
 
Content
Evolution
  Early Changes in Thought
  Charles Darwin
  The Tenets of Darwinian Theory
  Other Theories of Evolution
  The First Organisms
  Prokaryotic Life
  Eukaryotic Life
  The Emergence of Seed Plants
  Grasses
  Human Life
  Life over Time

Darwinian theory is based on several tenets:
  1. Species tend to produce more individuals than can be accommodated.
  2. Variations occur among offspring. Some variations yield a greater capacity to adapt to the environment and, thus, to survive. Such variations are significant when they are inheritable.
  3. Certain forms are thus better able to survive than are others. This is referred to as natural selection, or survival of the fittest. Variations that are inheritable make evolution inevitable.

 
     
 
 
     



     
 
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