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  Section: Microbiology Methods » Diagnostic Microbiology In Action
 
 
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Clinical Specimens from the Respiratory Tract

 
     
 
Content
Diagnostic Microbiology In Action
  Microbiology of the Respiratory Tract
    Staphylococci
      Isolation and Identification of Staphylococci
      Staphylococci in the Normal Flora
    Streptococci, Pneumococci, and Enterococci
      Isolation and Identification of Streptococci
      The CAMP Test for Group B Streptococci
      Identification of Pneumococci
      Identification of Enterococci
      Streptococci in the Normal Flora
    Haemophilus, Corynebacteri and Bordetella
      Haemophilus
      Corynebacteria
      Bordetella
    Clinical Specimens from the Respiratory Tract
      Laboratory Diagnosis of a Sore Throat
      Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Pneumonia
      Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test of an Isolate from a Clinical Specimen

Now that you have had some experience with the normal flora and the most common bacterial pathogens of the respiratory tract, you will have an opportunity to apply what you have learned to the laboratory diagnosis of respiratory infections. In Experiments 23.1 and 23.2 you will prepare cultures of a throat swab and a sputum specimen, each simulating material that might be obtained from a sick patient. These cultures should be examined with particular attention to the “physician’s” stated tentative diagnosis. Significant organisms that may be isolated must be identified and reported. If organisms that you consider to be part of the normal flora are isolated, report as “normal flora.”

In Experiment 23.3, you will set up an antimicrobial susceptibility test on an organism isolated from one of the clinical specimens previously cultured, and prepare a report of the results for the “physician.”

 
     
 
 
     




     
 
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