Algae, Tree, Herbs, Bush, Shrub, Grasses, Vines, Fern, Moss, Spermatophyta, Bryophyta, Fern Ally, Flower, Photosynthesis, Eukaryote, Prokaryote, carbohydrate, vitamins, amino acids, botany, lipids, proteins, cell, cell wall, biotechnology, metabolities, enzymes, agriculture, horticulture, agronomy, bryology, plaleobotany, phytochemistry, enthnobotany, anatomy, ecology, plant breeding, ecology, genetics, chlorophyll, chloroplast, gymnosperms, sporophytes, spores, seed, pollination, pollen, agriculture, horticulture, taxanomy, fungi, molecular biology, biochemistry, bioinfomatics, microbiology, fertilizers, insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, plant growth regulators, medicinal plants, herbal medicines, chemistry, cytogenetics, bryology, ethnobotany, plant pathology, methodolgy, research institutes, scientific journals, companies, farmer, scientists, plant nutrition
Select Language:
 
 
 
 
Main Menu
Please click the main subject to get the list of sub-categories
 
Services offered
 
 
 
 
  Section: Plant Nutrition » Micronutrients » Copper
 
 
Please share with your friends:  
 
 

Copper in Human and Animal Nutrition

 
     
 
Content
The Element Copper
  Copper Chemistry
Copper in Plants
  Uptake and Metabolism
  Phytoremediation
Copper Deficiency in Plants
Copper Toxicity in Plants
Copper in the Soil
  Geological Distribution of Copper in Soils
  Copper Availability in Soils
Copper in Human and Animal Nutrition
  Dietary Sources of Copper
  Metabolism of Copper Forms
Copper and Human Health
  Copper Deficiency and Toxicity in Humans
References

Copper was identified as an essential human dietary element approximately 65 years ago (120). Copper is a required catalytic cofactor of selective oxidoreductases and is important for ATP synthesis, normal brain development and neurological function, immune system integrity, cardiovascular health, and bone density in elderly adults (120). Animals and humans exploit copper by cycling the element between the oxidized cupric ion and the reduced cuprous ion for single-electron transfer reactions (120). Because free or loosely bound copper has the potential to generate free radicals capable of causing tissue pathology, organisms have developed sophisticated mechanisms for its orderly acquisition, distribution, use, and excretion (120).

 
     
 
 
     



     
 
Copyrights 2012 © Biocyclopedia.com | Disclaimer