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  Section: Principles of Horticulture » Plant propagation
 
 
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Vegetative propagation

 
     
 
Content
Plant propagation
  Seed propagation
  Sowing and aftercare in protected environments
  Sowing in the open
  Vegetative propagation
  Characteristics of propagation from vegetative parts
  Natural vegetative propagation
  Divisions
  Rhizomes
  Bulbs
  Artificial methods of propagation
  Cuttings
  Budding and grafting
  Tissue culture

All plants have the potential to reproduce asexually. In plants this practice is known as vegetative propagation; pieces of the parent plant are removed and these develop into wholly independent plants.

All living cells contain a nucleus with a complete set of genetic information (see genetic code, Pollination and fertilization), with the potential to become any specialized cell type (totipotency). Only part of the total information is brought into operation at any one time and for any position in the plant. If parts of the plant are removed, then cells lose their orientation in the whole plant and are able to produce organs in positions not found in the usual organization. These are described as adventitious and can, for example, be roots on a stem cutting, buds on a piece of root, or roots and buds on a piece of leaf used for vegetative propagation.

 
     
 
 
     



     
 
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