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  Section: Plant Nutrition » Micronutrients » Chlorine
 
 
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Historical Information

 
     
 
Content
Historical Information
  Determination of Essentiality
  Functions in Plants
Diagnosis of Chlorine Status in Plants
  Symptoms of Deficiency
  Symptoms of Excess
  Concentrations of Chlorine in Plants
    - Chlorine Constituents
    - Total Chlorine
    - Distribution in Plants
    - Critical Concentrations
    - Chlorine Concentrations in Crops
Assessment of Chlorine Status in Soils
  Forms of Chlorine
  Soil Tests
  Chlorine Contents of Soil
Fertilizers for Chlorine
  Kinds
  Application
References

Chlorine is classified as a micronutrient, but it is often taken up by plants at levels comparable to a macronutrient. Supplies of chlorine in nature are often plentiful, and obvious symptoms of deficiency are seldom observed. In many crops it is necessary to remove chlorine from air, chemicals, and water to induce symptoms of chlorine deficiency. Using precautions to establish a relatively chlorine-free environment, Broyer et al. (1) was able to convincingly demonstrate that chlorine is an essential nutrient. Although crop responses to chlorine applications in the field were suspected as early as the mid-1800s, it was not until fairly recently that chlorine was considered a potentially limiting nutrient for crop production under field conditions. In the 1980s, the responsiveness of some crops to chlorine fertilization became recognized more widely (2). Even though chlorine has gained the attention of agronomists, much of the focus on chlorine in terms of crop production continues to be over the presence of excess levels of chloride salts in soils, water, and fertilizers (3,4).

 
     
 
 
     



     
 
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