Fertilizers for Magnesium

Content

Historical Information
  Determination of Essentiality
Function in Plants
  Metabolic Processes
  Growth
  Fruit Yield and Quality
Diagnosis of Magnesium Status in Plants
  Symptoms of Deficiency and Excess
    - Symptoms of Deficiency
    - Symptoms of Excess
  Environmental Causes of Deficiency Symptoms
  Nutrient Imbalances and Symptoms of Deficiency
    - Potassium and Magnesium
    - Calcium and Magnesium
    - Nitrogen and Magnesium
    - Sodium and Magnesium
    - Iron and Magnesium
    - Manganese and Magnesium
    - Zinc and Magnesium
    - Phosphorus and Magnesium
    - Copper and Magnesium
    - Chloride and Magnesium
    - Aluminum and Magnesium
  Phenotypic Differences in Accumulation
  Genotypic Differences in Accumulation
Concentrations of Magnesium in Plants
  Magnesium Constituents
    - Distribution in Plants
    - Seasonal Variations
    - Physiological Aspects of Magnesium Allocation
  Critical Concentrations
    - Tissue Magnesium Concentration Associations with Crop Yields
    - Tabulated Data of Concentrations by Crops
Assessment of Magnesium in Soils
  Forms of Magnesium in Soils
  Sodium Absorption Ratio
  Soil Tests
  Tabulated Data on Magnesium Contents in Soils
    - Soil Types
Fertilizers for Magnesium
  Kinds of Fertilizers
  Effects of Fertilizers on Plant Growth
  Application of Fertilizers
References
 

Kinds of fertilizers


Magnesium-containing fertilizers are derived from the mining of natural mineral deposits or through synthetic processing. Organic magnesium sources include most manures (209). The magnesium availability to plants from different fertilizers will be dictated by the water solubility of the compounds, release rates from fertilizer coatings (where applicable), and particle size, with the finer particles solubilizing more quickly than the coarser-grade fertilizers. Magnesium concentrations and solubility characteristics for some common fertilizers are listed in Table 6.3.