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  Section: Plant Nutrition » Micronutrients » Manganese
 
 
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Toxicity Symptoms

 
     
 
Content
Introduction
Forms of Manganese and Abundance in Soils
Importance to Plants and Animals
  Essentiality of Manganese to Higher Plants
  Function in Plants
  Importance to Animals
Absorption and Mobility
  Absorption Mechanisms
  Distribution and Mobility of Manganese in Plants
Manganese Deficiency
  Prevalence
  Indicator Plants
  Symptoms
  Tolerance
Toxicity
  Prevalence
  Indicator Plants
  Symptoms
  Tolerance
Manganese and Diseases
Conclusion
References

The visual symptoms of manganese toxicity vary depending on the plant species and the level of tolerance to an excess of this nutrient. Localized as well as high overall concentrations of manganese are responsible for toxicity symptoms such as leaf speckling in barley(112), internal bark necrosis in apple (113), and leaf marginal chlorosis in mustard (Brassica spp. L.) (114).


The symptoms observed include yellowing beginning at the leaf edge of older leaves, sometimes leading to an upward cupping (crinkle leaf in cotton, (115)), and brown necrotic peppering on older leaves. Other symptoms include leaf puckering in soybeans and snap bean (116); marginal chlorosis and necrosis of leaves in alfalfa, rape (Brassica napus L.), kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala DC.), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) (116); necrotic spots on leaves in barley, lettuce, and soybeans (116); and necrosis in apple bark (i.e., bark measles) (60). Symptoms in soybeans include chlorotic specks and leaf crinkling as a result of raised interveinal areas (117,118); chlorotic leaf tips, necrotic areas, and leaf distortion (102) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

 
     
 
 
     



     
 
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